How To Propagate A Hoya!

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In this article, the focus is on propagating a Hoya plant through water propagation.

The article covers the basics of pruning and propagation, including identifying new growth points and trimming for propagation containers.

Everything Plants emphasizes the importance of maintaining water for cuttings and observing root growth. The article also briefly touches on alternative propagation methods.

Key Takeaways

  • Prune Hoya plants just past the leaf node to encourage new growth stem.
  • Cut up the vine into single leaf cuttings and place them in water for propagation.
  • Change the water every week and wait for roots to appear before transplanting to soil.
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Pruning and Propagation Basics

In this video, Everything Plants demonstrates how to prune and propagate a Hoya plant using water.

The first step is to identify where to make the cut, which is just past the leaf closest to the leaf node.

Using clean, sterile pruning shears, he cuts the longer strands of the plant. The cut portion will dry up and die back while a new growth stem will most likely pop out from the closest leaf node.

After pruning, he cuts the strands into single leaf cuttings, making sure to discard any excess pieces.

The cuttings are then placed in a shallow propagation container filled with water, making sure to avoid having any leaves in the water.

The container is placed in a bright, sunny area, and the water is changed every week or so to ensure fresh oxygenation.

Within the next two weeks, roots will start to pop up, and eventually, the cuttings can be repotted into fresh soil to start an entirely new Hoya plant.

He prefers the water method for propagation, but other methods such as sphagnum moss and perlite can also be used.

Cutting the Hoya Strand

To propagate a Hoya plant in water, it is necessary to cut a longer strand off and make the cut just past the leaf closest to the leaf node. This will result in a new growth stem popping out from the closest leaf node.

After cutting the strand, it is important to discard the dried-up portion and keep the new growth point, which is the nub that pops out through the leaf node leaf line area.

The same process should be repeated for all the longer stems branching off from the Hoya plant.

After cutting, the individual cuttings should be made by cutting above the leaf node.

The cuttings can then be placed in a propagation container filled with water.

It is recommended to choose a shallow propagation container to keep the cuttings from falling out.

It is also important to avoid having any leaves in the water and to change the water every week or so to keep it fresh and oxygenated.

Within the next two weeks, roots should start to appear, and the cuttings can be moved to a bright, sunny area to continue growing.

Once the roots are long enough, about an inch or two in length, the cuttings can be repotted into fresh soil to start an entirely new Hoya plant.

This water propagation method is just one of many ways to propagate Hoyas. Some people prefer to use sphagnum moss or perlite as a propagation medium. However, the water method is preferred by some, as it is easy and effective.

Identifying New Growth Points

Everything Plants demonstrates how to identify new growth points on a Hoya plant in order to propagate it in water.

He starts by cutting off a longer strand of the plant just past a leaf closest to the leaf node using clean sterilized pruning shears.

The portion where the cut was made will dry up and die back, and a new growth stem is likely to emerge from the closest leaf node.

This new growth point will eventually push out new leaves and stems, resulting in the formation of a new vine.

He also shows how to cut up the vine into single leaf cuttings, which will each produce their own stem and eventually root in water.

He recommends changing the water every week or so to provide fresh oxygenated water for the plant.

Once the roots have grown to about an inch or two in length, the plant can be repotted into fresh soil to start an entirely new plant from single leaf cuttings.

Preparing for Water Propagation

To propagate a Hoya plant in water, it is important to know where to make the cut. He in the video demonstrates how to prune a Hoya plant in order to propagate it in water.

He suggests using clean and sterile pruning shears to make a cut just past the leaf closest to the leaf node. This will leave a whole strand that can be used for water propagation.

The portion where the cut was made will dry up and die back, and a new growth stem will most likely pop out from the closest leaf node.

He shows a Hoya crinkle eight that he recently propagated using this method. He points out the new growth point, where a new vine will eventually start pushing out new leaves and stems.

After pruning the plant, he cuts the strands into single leaf cuttings. He discards some pieces and keeps others, depending on their potential for rooting.

The cuttings are then placed in water to start the propagation process.

He recommends changing the water every week or so to keep it fresh and oxygenated.

Roots should start to appear within the next two weeks, and when they are long enough, about an inch or two in length, the cuttings can be repotted into fresh soil to start an entirely new Hoya plant.

He prefers the water method for propagating Hoyas, but acknowledges that others use sphagnum moss or perlite with good success.

He invites viewers to leave a comment if they propagate Hoyas and let him know which method they prefer.

Trimming for Propagation Containers

Everything Plants demonstrates how to trim a Hoya plant for propagation in water.

To begin, he suggests using clean, sterile pruning shears to cut a longer strand of the plant just past the leaf closest to the leaf node.

The portion where the cut was made will dry up and die back, and a new growth stem will most likely emerge from the closest leaf node.

He then shows a Hoya Crinkle Eight that was recently propagated using this method, pointing out the new growth point where a new vine will eventually start pushing out new leaves and stems.

He repeats the process with another longer stem branching off from a Hoya Carnosa, cutting it back as close as possible to the leaf node.

Next, he cuts the two strands into single leaf cuttings, discarding one piece and cutting the others up into eight individual cuttings that will each produce their own stem.

He notes that depending on the size of the propagation container, it may be necessary to trim back some of the stem to prevent the cuttings from falling out.

He also points out little bumps along the stem where roots will most likely pop out and suggests changing the water every week or so to provide fresh oxygenated water.

The cuttings should start to produce roots within the next two weeks or so, and once the roots are long enough, about an inch or two in length, the cutting can be repotted into fresh soil to start an entirely new Hoya plant.

Root Development Indicators

When propagating a Hoya plant, it is important to know where to prune in order to encourage root growth.

The best place to make a cut is just past the leaf closest to the leaf node. This will allow for a new growth stem to emerge from the closest leaf node, where a new vine will eventually start pushing out new leaves and stems.

After making the cut, the portion where the cut was made will dry up and die back, indicating that a new growth point has emerged.

This new growth point will be marked by a little nub, which will eventually produce a new vine.

When propagating Hoyas in water, it is important to look for indicators of root development.

These indicators are small bumps along the stem, which are known as aerial roots. These bumps are where the roots will most likely pop out from, indicating that the plant is ready to be repotted into fresh soil.

By using these indicators to guide the pruning process and monitor root development, propagating Hoyas can be a fun and easy project for any plant enthusiast.

Maintaining Water for Cuttings

After cutting the stems and making single leaf cuttings, it is important to maintain the water for the cuttings to ensure successful propagation.

The cuttings should be placed in a shallow propagation container with fresh oxygenated water.

The container should be placed in a bright sunny area to encourage root growth.

It is recommended to change the water every week or so to provide the cuttings with fresh oxygen and nutrients.

The leaves should be kept out of the water to prevent rotting.

Within the next two weeks, roots should start to appear from the little bumps along the stem.

Once the roots are about an inch or two in length, the cuttings can be repotted into fresh soil to start a new Hoya plant.

Observing Root Growth

Everything Plants demonstrates how to propagate a Hoya plant by cutting off a longer strand and making a cut just past the closest leaf node.

The cut portion will dry up and die back, while a new growth stem will most likely pop out from the closest leaf node.

He shows a Hoya Crinkle 8 that was recently propagated, where a new vine will eventually start pushing out new leaves and stems from the leaf node area.

He then proceeds to cut up the strands into single leaf cuttings, discarding some pieces and keeping others.

The cuttings are placed in water, and he notes that roots will most likely pop out from the little bumps along the stem.

He recommends changing the water every week or so and placing the cuttings in a bright, sunny area to wait for the roots to grow.

Once the roots are long enough, about an inch or two in length, the cuttings can be repotted into fresh soil, and a new Hoya plant can be started from the single leaf cuttings.

He prefers the water method of propagation, but notes that others use sphagnum moss or perlite with success.

Transplanting to Soil

After propagating the Hoya plant in water, the next step is to transplant it to soil.

Once the roots have grown to about an inch or two in length, it is time to move the plant to a container with fresh soil.

To begin the transplanting process, gently remove the plant from the water and shake off any excess water.

Next, prepare a container with fresh soil and make a hole in the center.

Place the plant in the hole, making sure the roots are spread out evenly.

Cover the roots with soil and gently pat it down to secure the plant in place.

Water the plant thoroughly and place it in a bright, sunny area.

Alternative Propagation Methods

In addition to using sphagnum moss as a propagation medium, there are other methods that can be used to propagate hoya plants.

One such method is the water propagation method.

By cutting off longer strands of the hoya plant and making a cut just past the closest leaf node, a new growth stem will most likely pop out from this closest leaf node. This new vine will eventually start pushing out new leaves and stems, resulting in a new hoya plant.

To propagate hoya plants using the water propagation method, the cuttings are placed in water.

Within the next two weeks or so, roots will start to appear.

Once the roots are long enough, about an inch or two in length, the cutting can be repotted into fresh soil, resulting in an entirely new hoya plant.

While the water propagation method is preferred by some, others have had success using perlite as a propagation medium.

Comparing the root growth or progress between water, sphagnum moss, and perlite is an option for those interested in experimenting with different propagation methods.

If you propagate hoyas, it is recommended to try different methods and see which one works best for you.