10 Crops You’d Be Silly Not To Plant In July RIGHT NOW!

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July is a great month to enjoy the harvest and plan for further planting in the garden. In this article, the focus will be on some top picks for July, as shared by experts in the Epic gardening ecosystem. One of the picks is the beautiful and easy-to-grow Salvia, which is a perennial plant that blooms in late summer and early fall.

Another topic covered in this article is corn growth myths and strategies to prevent corn cross-pollination. Contrary to the popular belief that corn should be knee-high by the 4th of July, the height of the corn is not a reliable indicator of a successful harvest. Instead, gardeners should pay attention to the timing and physical distance of their corn plants to prevent cross-pollination. Additionally, this article provides tips for growing arugula in the heat and planting fall crops in Florida, including optimal pumpkin planting techniques.

Key Takeaways

  • Salvia is a beautiful and easy-to-grow perennial plant that blooms in late summer and early fall.
  • Gardeners should pay attention to the timing and physical distance of their corn plants to prevent cross-pollination and ensure a successful harvest.
  • Growing arugula in the heat and planting fall crops in Florida, including pumpkins, require specific techniques and considerations.
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Enjoying the Harvest and Planning Further Planting

It’s July in the garden, which means it’s time to enjoy the harvest and think about what else to plant this season. There are still some things that can be planted in July, and Epic Gardening’s experts have shared their top picks for the month.

One surprising suggestion is Salvia, an ornamental plant that brings beauty and attracts pollinators. It’s a perennial plant that can start now for late summer and early fall blooms. To ensure more blooms, it’s recommended to prune the stems down in the offseason.

For corn growers, it’s important to avoid cross-pollination between different varieties of corn. This can be done by timing the planting of different varieties at least two weeks apart or by having physical distance or barriers between them.

Arugula, a cool-season crop, can still be grown in the middle of summer by planting it in a shady spot or indoors using grow lights. When planting indoors, make sure to use a container with a drainage hole and fill it with potting soil, leaving space at the top for watering.

In Florida, July marks the start of planting for fall crops, such as jack-o’-lantern pumpkins. It’s important to plant them about 100-110 days before the first frost threat and ensure that the flowers bloom after the peak of summer heat. Pumpkins prefer well-drained and rich soil.

By enjoying the harvest and planning for further planting, gardeners can make the most out of their summer season and prepare for a bountiful fall harvest.

Discovering the Salvia

In the middle of summer, it’s time to think about what else to plant in the garden. The Salvia plant is a great option for late summer and early fall blooms. Salvia is a perennial plant that is native to many climates, so gardeners should look up the native plants in their area to find a Salvia that fits their specific climate.

Salvia comes in many different varieties, including Violet Queen and Blue Victory. Gardeners can experiment with different varieties that they find fun and interesting. Salvia is a great plant to start in mid-season to get some late summer and early fall blooms. It’s also a great plant to establish for the next spring growth.

Salvia plants bring many different pollinators, including hummingbirds, monarchs, and swallowtails. To maintain the plant, gardeners should track the stems all the way down to where they start to branch off. Any spent stems should be pruned down in the offseason to get more blooms.

Salvia is a great addition to any garden, providing beautiful blooms and attracting a variety of pollinators.

Salvia Maintenance Tips

Salvia is a beautiful perennial plant that can be grown in zones 8 and above. It is a great plant to start in July to get late summer and early fall blooms. Salvia attracts a variety of pollinators such as hummingbirds, monarchs, and swallowtails.

To ensure that Salvia continues to bloom, it is important to prune the stems all the way down to where they start to branch off. This will encourage the plant to produce more blooms.

There are many different varieties of Salvia, and it is important to choose one that is native to your climate or experiment with ones that you find fun and interesting. Two popular varieties are Violet Queen and Blue Victory.

If you live in a colder climate, it may be too late to plant Salvia in July, but you can still grow it in a pot and bring it inside for the winter.

Overall, Salvia is a low-maintenance plant that can add beauty and attract pollinators to your garden.

Debunking Corn Growth Myths

When it comes to growing corn, there are many myths that have been circulated among gardeners. One of the most common is the “knee high by 4th of July” myth, which suggests that if corn is not at least knee high by the 4th of July, it will not yield a good harvest. However, this myth is false and outdated, as most modern hybrid corn varieties are much taller by this time of year.

Another myth that has been perpetuated is that planting different types of corn at the same time can lead to cross-pollination and result in mutant or funky corn. While this is true, there are ways to prevent cross-pollination. One way is to plant corn varieties that have different days to maturity, with a minimum of two weeks between them. Another way is to physically separate the corn patches with barriers or distance.

It is important to note that corn is a crop that can still be planted in July, as long as there is a solid three months of growing season left. However, it is crucial to take the necessary precautions to prevent cross-pollination and ensure a successful harvest.

In summary, it is important for gardeners to not fall prey to common corn growth myths. By following the proper planting techniques and taking the necessary precautions, a bountiful corn harvest can be achieved.

Strategies to Prevent Corn Cross-Pollination

Corn cross-pollination can result in mutant and funky corn, which can affect the flavor of the corn. To prevent cross-pollination, there are two strategies that can be used.

The first strategy is timing. Gardeners should look at the days of maturity for their corn variety and ensure that any other corn variety they plant is at least two weeks apart in maturity. For example, if one corn variety has a maturity date of 80 days, the second variety should have a maturity date of at least 94 days to prevent cross-pollination. However, this strategy is not foolproof since the maturity dates are not exact and have a 10-day range.

The second strategy is to have physical distance or barriers between the corn patches. Gardeners can plant corn patches at least 100 feet apart or have a fence or trees between them to prevent cross-pollination.

By using these strategies, gardeners can prevent cross-pollination and ensure that their corn harvest is not affected by mutant or funky corn.

Growing Arugula in the Heat

Arugula is a cool season crop that prefers temperatures between 55 to 65°F. While it can tolerate light frosts, it will bolt in the heat. However, there are a few different options to grow it in the middle of the summer. One can choose to put it in a shady spot when temperatures are above 85°F, use shade cloths, or grow it indoors.

To grow arugula indoors, one needs a container with a drainage hole that is at least 4 to 6 inches deep to accommodate for the roots of the plant. When filling it with potting soil, leave a little bit of space at the top for watering. Keep the soil consistently moist, especially while waiting for the seeds to germinate, but make sure not to overwater. Typically, plants indoors do not need to be watered as much as the ones in the garden because it is not as hot as it is outside.

By following these tips, one can grow arugula all season long, even in the heat of summer.

Indoor Arugula Cultivation Tips

Arugula is a cool season crop that prefers temperatures between 55 to 65°F, making it difficult to grow during the summer months. However, there are a few options for growing arugula indoors during the hot summer months.

To grow arugula indoors, one will need a container with a drainage hole that is at least 4 to 6 inches deep to accommodate the roots of the plant. When filling the container with potting soil, it is important to leave a little bit of space at the top for watering. The soil should be kept consistently moist, especially while waiting for the seeds to germinate, but overwatering should be avoided.

During the hot summer months, arugula can be grown in a shady spot outdoors when temperatures are above 85°F, or shade cloths can be used. Alternatively, arugula can be grown indoors using grow lights.

By following these tips, gardeners can enjoy arugula all season long, even during the summer months when it is typically difficult to grow.

Planting Fall Crops in Florida

In Florida, fall planting begins as early as July. This is the perfect time for gardeners to start planning ahead for the cooler season. Pumpkins are a popular choice for a fall harvest, but getting the planting window right is crucial. The rule of thumb in Central Florida is to plant pumpkins in early July, as they have a long maturity period of 100 to 110 days for larger pumpkins. This ensures that gardeners can harvest before any frost threat arrives, while also allowing the flowers to bloom after the peak of summer heat.

When planting pumpkins, it’s important to sow the seeds about twice as deep as they are big, which is typically around 1 inch deep in the mound. Well-drained soil is preferred, but pumpkins also thrive in fairly rich soil.

For those looking to grow salad greens, arugula is a popular choice. However, it’s a cool-season crop that prefers temperatures between 55 to 65°F and can bolt in the heat. To grow arugula in the middle of summer, gardeners can put it in a shady spot when temperatures exceed 85°F, use shade cloths, or grow it indoors with grow lights.

When growing arugula indoors, gardeners will need a container with a drainage hole and a depth of at least 4 to 6 inches to accommodate the roots. The soil should be kept consistently moist, but not overwatered.

Corn is another crop that can be planted in July, but gardeners should be cautious about cross-pollination. Hybrid varieties of corn are now commonly grown and are typically chest or head high by July, making the “knee-high by 4th of July” metric outdated. To avoid cross-pollination, gardeners can plant corn varieties with different days to maturity or use physical barriers to separate the plants.

Finally, Salvia is a great plant to start in mid-season for late summer and early fall blooms. It’s a perennial plant, making it ideal for gardeners in zones 8 and up. There are many different varieties of Salvia, and gardeners should look up native plants in their area to find a variety that fits their specific climate. Pruning stems in the offseason can encourage more blooms and attract various pollinators.

Optimal Pumpkin Planting Techniques

Planting pumpkins for a fall harvest in the Southeast can be challenging, as the planting window must be timed just right. The rule of thumb in Central Florida is to plant in early July, as pumpkins have a long maturity period of 100 to 110 days for larger varieties. This ensures that they can be harvested before any frost threat arises, while also allowing the flowers to bloom after the peak of summer heat.

When planting, it is recommended to sow the seeds about two times as deep as they are big, typically around 1 inch deep in the mound. Pumpkins prefer well-drained soil that is also rich in nutrients.

By following these optimal pumpkin planting techniques, gardeners in the Southeast can enjoy a bountiful harvest of jack-o’-lantern pumpkins in the fall season.