Ultimate ANTHURIUM (Flamingo Flower) Care Guide


Anthuriums, also known as flamingo flowers, are a popular and beloved house plant. This plant is a member of a large genus which includes about 950 species throughout Central and South America.

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Anthuriums are known for their heart-shaped leaves and vibrantly colored spates or bracks, which can be found in deep shades of maroons, reds, lavenders, pinks, oranges, and white.

Anthuriums are typically cultivated from Anthurium andreanum and Ethereum antiochiensis in the United States, and Anthurium chesrienum throughout Europe and Asia.

These plants are bred for both the cut flower industry and the potted plant market. Most of the cultivars selected for potted plants are more compact and have more beautiful leaves.

While these plants are primarily produced by tissue culture, they can also be propagated by dividing the plant.

Anthurium Overview

Anthurium, also known as Flamingo Flower, is a popular and beloved house plant. It is a member of a large genus that includes about 950 species throughout Central and South America.

However, only the common ones that are cultivated and selected are more or less similar in appearance. These plants have heart-shaped leaves and vibrantly colored spathes or bracts in deep shades of maroons, reds, lavenders, pinks, oranges, and whites.

The most commonly cultivated species of Anthurium are Anthurium andreanum, Anthurium antiochiensis, and Anthurium chesrienum.

Anthurium antokiensis is typically found along stream banks and has an upright, thinner, and more delicate spathe, whereas Anthurium andreanum and Anthurium chesrienum are more rainforest species growing as epiphytes on trees. Both have larger spathes and are the only two Anthuriums that are scarlet.

Anthuriums are bred for both the cut flower industry and the potted plant market. The ones selected for potted plants are more compact and have more beautiful leaves. These plants are produced by tissue culture.

Anthuriums prefer to be in warm and humid conditions, and they do not tolerate drafts or extreme temperatures.

They require a well-balanced fertilizer during the growing season. Anthuriums are primarily produced by tissue culture, but for the home gardener, they can be propagated by dividing the plant.

The growing medium for Anthuriums is typically equal parts perlite and some type of bark, which allows for good aeration.

Anthurium Types

Anthurium, also known as Flamingo Flower, is a popular house plant that belongs to a large genus with approximately 950 species throughout Central and South America.

However, there are believed to be up to 2,000 species that have not yet been identified or discovered. The common Anthuriums that are cultivated and selected for potted plants are primarily from Anthurium andreanum, Anthurium antiochiensis in the United States, and Anthurium chesrienum throughout Europe and Asia.

Anthurium antiochiensis is typically found along stream banks and has an upright, thinner, and more delicate spadix. On the other hand, Anthurium andreanum and Anthurium chesrienum are rainforest species that grow as epiphytes, which means they grow on trees, but can also grow terrestrially.

Both have larger spathes and are the only two Anthuriums that are scarlet. Anthurium chesrinum has a notable curly q spadex, earning it the common name “Pigtail” Anthurium, but it is not commonly found in widespread cultivation in the United States.

The Anthuriums that are selected for potted plants are more compact and have beautiful leaves. Generally, these plants are produced by tissue culture.

In the greenhouse, they are grown in high or bright light, and studies show that some cultivars’ spathes increase in lower light levels, but they get more flowers in higher light levels.

Anthuriums prefer to be well over 55 degrees Fahrenheit, which is approximately 13 degrees Celsius and would prefer to be in the 70 to 90-degree Fahrenheit range, which is 21 to 32 degrees Celsius.

They prefer to be in tropical forest canopies and like to be on the warm side. If exposed to drafty windows in the winter months or air conditioning during the summer months, it will likely stress or harm the plant.

In terms of propagation, Anthuriums are primarily produced by tissue culture, but for the home gardener, they can be divided. The plant can be divided by pulling it apart and replanting it in a more porous and aerated growing medium, which is typically equal parts perlite and some type of bark.

Fertilizing should be done during the growing season, and a well-balanced fertilizer will be suitable. Monthly fertilizing should be fine. For more inflorescences, an organic orchid fertilizer with a 1-3-1 phosphorus value typically promotes more blooming.

Growing Conditions

Anthuriums, also known as flamingo flowers, are tropical houseplants that are typically grown as epiphytes in rainforest environments.

They prefer warm temperatures ranging from 70 to 90 degrees Fahrenheit (21 to 32 degrees Celsius) and are sensitive to drafts and cold temperatures. Anthuriums require high light levels for optimal growth and flowering, but certain cultivars have been shown to produce larger spathes in lower light conditions.

These plants prefer porous and well-aerated potting mixes, typically composed of equal parts perlite and bark. Espoma organic orchid and bromeliad mix, cactus mix, and perlite are commonly used in potting mixes for anthuriums.

Fertilization during the growing season with a balanced fertilizer is recommended, with monthly applications being sufficient. For increased blooming, organic orchid fertilizers with a 1-3-1 phosphorus value are recommended.

Propagation of anthuriums is typically done through tissue culture, but home gardeners can divide their plants by separating the clumps and repotting them in a suitable potting mix.

Anthuriums are known for their long-lasting blooms, with each inflorescence lasting up to two to three months. Cultivars vary in their floriferousness, with some producing more blooms than others.

Potting and Soil Mix

Anthuriums are commonly grown as potted plants and require a well-draining soil mix that is more porous and aerated.

The typical growing medium is equal parts perlite and some type of bark, such as Espoma Organic Orchid and Bromeliad mix and cactus mix with added perlite.

This mix is suitable for both terrestrial and epiphytic plants.

Fertilizing is important during the growing season, and a well-balanced fertilizer should be used on a monthly basis. To promote more blooming, an organic orchid fertilizer with a 1-3-1 phosphorus value can be used.

Propagation of anthuriums can be done by dividing the plant. The plant should be removed from the pot and the dirt scraped away.

The clump can then be divided by gently pulling it apart. The separated plant can then be re-potted in a new container with fresh soil mix.

Fertilizing

During the growing season, it is important to fertilize anthuriums with a well-balanced fertilizer on a monthly basis.

However, if the goal is to promote more blooming, an organic orchid fertilizer with a one-three-one phosphorus value can be used.

It is important to note that fertilization should only be done during the growing season.

Propagation

Anthuriums are primarily produced by tissue culture, but home gardeners can propagate them by dividing the plant.

To divide the plant, the gardener should scrape away as much dirt as possible and separate the clumps by working their fingers in between them. The divided plant can then be repotted in a well-aerated and porous growing medium, typically consisting of equal parts perlite and some type of bark.

Fertilizing the plant with a well-balanced fertilizer monthly during the growing season is suitable, but using an organic orchid fertilizer with a 1-3-1 phosphorus value can promote more blooming.

Anthuriums prefer high or bright light levels, and studies show that some cultivars have increased spadex size in lower light levels, but more flowers in higher light levels.

These plants prefer warm temperatures between 70 to 90 degrees Fahrenheit, and humidity levels are not as crucial, but they do prefer to be in moist soil.

Typically, these plants are grown in nursery pots, but they can also be grown on rocks in water propagation arrangements.

Common Problems

Anthuriums are generally easy to care for, but they can face a few common issues. Here are some problems that may arise when growing anthuriums:

  • Root rot: Overwatering can cause root rot, which can lead to yellowing leaves and stunted growth. To prevent this, make sure the soil is well-draining and allow the top inch of soil to dry out before watering again.
  • Pests: Common pests that can affect anthuriums include spider mites, mealybugs, and scale insects. Regularly inspect your plant for signs of pests and treat them promptly with insecticidal soap or neem oil.
  • Brown leaf tips: Brown leaf tips can be caused by dry air or over-fertilization. To prevent this, maintain moderate humidity levels and fertilize sparingly.
  • Fungal leaf spot: Fungal leaf spot can appear as brown or black spots on the leaves. To prevent this, avoid getting water on the leaves and make sure the plant has adequate air circulation.
  • Wilting: Wilting can be caused by underwatering or exposure to cold temperatures. Make sure the soil is moist but not waterlogged, and keep the plant away from cold drafts.

By being aware of these common problems and taking the necessary precautions, you can keep your anthuriums healthy and thriving.

Sandy

I’m just a plant lover from Central Florida with a passion for sharing knowledgeable facts about all things plants.

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